King Charles's scandal-hit aide at the centre of the monarch's 'cash for honours' probe

The scandal-hit aide to King Charles once hosted a lavish masquerade ball for his daughter’s 21st birthday at a Scottish estate at the center of the monarch’s ‘honours money’ investigation.

  • Michael Fawcett threw a party for his daughter to celebrate her 21st birthday at the lavish Dumfries House, Scotland, owned by The Prince’s Foundation.
  • The June 2015 party lasted the weekend where the guests had a black-tie dinner
  • Mr. Fawcett was the CEO of the Prince’s Foundation at the time of the party.
  • Scotland Yard has opened a criminal investigation into the Prince’s Foundation

Flanked by horse-drawn carriages and with his arm around his daughter Emily, this is King Charles’s former aide, Michael Fawcett, at the masquerade ball he performed to celebrate his 21st birthday.

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But what will draw attention is the location of the lavish party: Dumfries House, the stately home in Scotland owned by The Prince’s Foundation.

The charity is the subject of a police investigation into allegations of ‘honours money’ following a series of stories in The Mail on Sunday.

Fawcett’s role as the foundation’s former executive director is under particular scrutiny.

The birthday party in June 2015 lasted the weekend at the 2,000-acre Ayrshire estate.

The birthday party in June 2015 lasted the weekend at the 2,000-acre Ayrshire estate.

The dinner was followed by a ball held in the Tapestry Room, adorned with 18th-century Flemish tapestries, with dozens of guests wearing ornate Venetian masks (pictured is Michael Fawcett with his daughter Emily)

The dinner was followed by a ball held in the Tapestry Room, adorned with 18th-century Flemish tapestries, with dozens of guests wearing ornate Venetian masks (pictured is Michael Fawcett with his daughter Emily)

The revelation that he held the party at Dumfries House will only reinforce the perception of his closeness to King Charles, for whom he was a valet before becoming his charity boss.

The birthday party in June 2015 lasted the weekend at the 2,000-acre Ayrshire estate.

Arriving at the stately home in horse-drawn carriages, guests sat down to a champagne gala dinner in a cavernous white marquee surrounded by gilt mirrors and spotlights.

The dinner was followed by a ball held in the Tapestry Room, adorned with 18th-century Flemish tapestries, with dozens of guests wearing ornate Venetian masks.

Joining Fawcett and Emily, now 28, were his wife Debbie and their son, Oliver, who is now 32 and runs a creative digital arts agency.

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Miss Fawcett posted dozens of photos on Facebook that had been taken inside a photo booth at the party. In one photo, Fawcett posed with a fake mustache as her daughter pursed her lips for the camera.

Among the guests were also the sons and daughters of the executives of the Spanish tile giant Porcelanosa, which years earlier had generated controversy with the then Prince of Wales after he accepted their donations for his charities and granted the company a license. real.

Fawcett, 59, has enjoyed repeated stays at a holiday home in Spain owned by the firm.

The revelation that she held the party at Dumfries House will only reinforce the perception of her closeness to King Charles, for whom she was a valet before becoming his charity boss.

The revelation that she held the party at Dumfries House will only reinforce the perception of her closeness to King Charles, for whom she was a valet before becoming his charity boss.

At the time of the party, Fawcett was the chief executive of the Prince’s Foundation with an annual salary of £311,000. The Trust has been in charge of the £30 million restoration of Dumfries House after the Prince purchased it for the nation in 2007.

There is no indication of wrongdoing on Fawcett’s part in holding the birthday party at Dumfries House, south of Glasgow.

Fawcett resigned from his role as chief executive of the Prince’s Foundation last year after The Mail on Sunday revealed how he had offered to help a Saudi billionaire, Mahfouz Marei Mubarak bin Mahfouz, obtain a knighthood and citizenship. in return for his continued generous donations of around £1.5 million to the future king’s charities.

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In exchange for donations made by Dr Mahfouz, who denies any wrongdoing, a fountain at Dumfries House is believed to be named after him, as well as several benches on the estate, but without King Charles’s knowledge.

Following the revelations, Scotland Yard opened a “honours money” criminal investigation into the Prince’s Foundation.

On Friday, the Met revealed that two men, one in his 40s and one in his 50s, had been questioned under precaution on September 6 as part of the investigation. A Palace source said it was unlikely the King himself would be questioned.

Last night, the Prince’s Trust said the correct procedures had been followed when the Fawcetts rented the place.

The Foundation said: ‘The business income generated by the Prince’s Foundation, including events, is invested in our education and training programs that help students get jobs and further their education and careers. We do not comment on details related to private functions at any of our rental locations.

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