Could Liz Truss' team get knighthoods?

Liz’s team in line for honours… after just 44 days on the job: Aide ‘lobbied for advisers to be knighted’ after seven weeks on the job with former PM online for £ 115k a year while leaving her out of the office at

  • Liz Truss’s closest advisers could be named on her resignation honors list
  • Chief of Staff Mark Fullbrook and Special Counsel Jason Stein discussed candidates
  • The suggestion has drawn furious criticism from rival political parties.
  • It comes days after the controversy over his £115k taxpayer-funded allocation

Liz Truss could shower her closest allies with knighthoods and peerages as part of a controversial list of resignation honors despite serving as prime minister for less than two months.

Mark Fullbrook, the former prime minister’s chief of staff, is believed to have suggested that he reward his outgoing staff and advisers with gongs.

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Key members of the Miss Truss team and major donors could be awarded knighthoods or peerages regardless of their disastrously short tenure.

Those in line for honors could include special counsel Jason Stein, who was suspended last week for a critical briefing on Sajid Javid.

Other names touted include policy adviser Jamie Hope, chief strategist Iain Carter, economic adviser Matthew Sinclair and deputy chief of staff Ruth Porter.

It was also suggested last night that Mr. Fullbrook had pushed for an honor, but this was denied by sources close to the former adviser.

Downing Street sources insisted it would follow convention for an outgoing prime minister to issue such a list. The opposition parties have already largely rounded up to the suggestion.

Willie Sullivan of the Electoral Reform Society said: “If Liz Truss chooses to pack the Lords with new peers as she leaves office, it will only further damage the legitimacy of Westminster at a time when public faith in politics is already to the limit”.

Former Prime Minister Liz Truss outside 10 Downing Street yesterday as she formally resigns after her disastrously short term.

Former Prime Minister Liz Truss outside 10 Downing Street yesterday as she formally resigns after her disastrously short term.

A removals van outside Downing St delivers Miss Truss's belongings to her family's home.

A removals van outside Downing St delivers Miss Truss’s belongings to her family’s home.

Mark Fullbrook, the former prime minister's chief of staff, is believed to have suggested that he reward his outgoing staff and advisers with noble titles.  Sources close to the adviser last night rejected claims that he had pushed for his own gong.

Mark Fullbrook, the former prime minister’s chief of staff, is believed to have suggested that he reward his outgoing staff and advisers with noble titles. Sources close to the adviser last night rejected claims that he had pushed for his own gong.

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Over the weekend, the outgoing prime minister held a series of farewell events for MPs and staff at Checkers on her last weekend in office.

The outgoing prime minister, who resigned this week after a disastrous spell at No. 10, used the mansion of grace and favor in Buckinghamshire for a series of farewell parties.

It was suggested that his disputed list of honors might be as controversial as Harold Wilson’s notorious ‘Lavender List’ of 1976 in which several recipients were wealthy businessmen.

Former Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s resignation honors list has yet to be released.

Labor Prime Ministers Tony Blair and Gordon Brown turned down the opportunity to present resignation honors amid the cash-for-spending scandal.

Brown handed out honors as part of his ‘dissolution list’ following the conclusion of Parliament which saw more than two dozen peerages handed out.

It comes days after a backlash erupted over Miss Truss’s controversial compensation package following the dramatic collapse of her premiership.

The former prime minister is set to receive a pay of nearly £20,000 and a taxpayer-funded allowance of up to £115,000 a year upon her resignation after just 44 days in office.

Public Service Cost Allowance (PDCA) was introduced in 1991 in the wake of Margaret Thatcher’s departure to “help former Prime Ministers still active in public life”.

Liz Truss, pictured leaving Downing Street on Friday, wore Checkers to a series of going away parties over the weekend

Liz Truss, pictured leaving Downing Street on Friday, wore Checkers to a series of going away parties over the weekend

A Downing Street source revealed that the prime minister, at her expense, had gathered MPs and staff at the 16th-century manor house in Buckinghamshire to thank them.

A Downing Street source revealed that the prime minister, at her expense, had gathered MPs and staff at the 16th-century manor house in Buckinghamshire to thank them.

They are entitled to the money for the rest of their lives, unless they take another public office.

Former PMs must provide supporting documents, such as staff salary details or travel receipts, to receive the cash.

Labor leader Sir Keir Starmer said it would be “the right thing” for Miss Truss not to claim any of the allowance.

He added: “She has served 44 days in office, she actually has no right to it, she should turn it down and not take it.”

The Liberal Democrats, meanwhile, were accused of hypocrisy after asking Miss Truss to reject the £115,000 annual allocation, despite its former leader Sir Nick Clegg claiming it for four years after his party was wiped out in 2015.

Sir Tony Blair still claims the full allowance despite being a millionaire. One Tory MP said: ‘The hypocrisy of the Left is always impressive. It knows no limits.

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